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MARKETANALYST.US / ECONOMY & WORK

Woman Nearly Loses $5K to a Fake AI-Driven $30-Per-Hour Job Offer

She was pretty convinced and later went to deposit a $5,000 check in the bank but the executives immediately declined to take that check.
PUBLISHED MAY 4, 2024
Cover Image Source: Woman almost lost $5K to fake job offer (representative image) | Unsplash | Photo by Clint Patterson
Cover Image Source: Woman almost lost $5K to fake job offer (representative image) | Unsplash | Photo by Clint Patterson

Everyone requires a job in this inflated economy for survival. In today's digital age, job seekers have become increasingly vulnerable to fraudulent job offers, particularly when facing desperate circumstances. With the emergence of remote setups, people are now looking for work-from-home jobs and if someone gets a lucrative salary in that kind of setup, being desperate about the offer is pretty human. But nowadays, employment or job scams are happening in the name of job offers where they promise to help the job seekers by giving them the offer letter. But as the process proceeds, they ask for bank account information for salary deposits, and there, the stealing starts. Here's how a woman from Jacksonville, Florida got scammed and was about to lose some dollars.



Jessica Brown a woman from Jacksonville, Florida was in dire need of a job as she was struggling with major financial problems. Recently, her husband suffered a stroke and she has a daughter to take care of. Hence, the scammers took advantage of her vulnerability. It all started with an email she received from a company called Synterax. She could not see any red flags in the beginning as the company is a reputable one working in the tech and IT industry. On the other hand, the job offer, too, was lucrative offering her $30 per hour and the flexibility of working from home. Additionally, the offer mentioned that Brown would receive a lump sum amount of $5,000 to satisfy her office supply needs.



The scammers made the job offer pretty enticing so that Brown couldn't decline it. She shared the email with the WJAX that said, "We reviewed your resume for the Junior Recruiter at Synterex. We think you could be a good fit for the opportunity. If you are able to work for the company for a period of 12-16 weeks, the materials automatically become yours." She was pretty convinced and later went to deposit a $5,000 check in the bank but the executives immediately declined to take that check. Brown further said, "The bank figured out right away this was a scam." She wanted to bring her case before the public, stating, "There are so many scams going on out there. The public needs to be aware of work-at-home scams."



After getting to know about the scam, Synterex issued a sympathizing statement saying, "Unfortunately, like many other companies, Synterex was targeted by a scammer who digitally impersonated us. Our hearts go out to any applicant who spends time applying for a job only to find out the process is not real. We understand how involved the talent acquisition process can be." The Federal Trade Commission then came forward to warn the job seekers and asked them to stay vigilant especially if any company pays them higher for a lesser amount of work. These are the biggest red flags. Eva Velasquez, President and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center, informed users about the AI-driven job offers and said, "It doesn’t take any time, and it costs very little for the scammers to develop picture and letter-perfect templates and online profiles. So, it looks very, very legitimate."

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