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MARKETANALYST.US / ECONOMY & WORK

All You Need to Know about the 'Amazon Product Tester' Jobs Scam

Beneath the promise of easy money lies a sophisticated scam preying on unsuspecting individuals seeking legitimate work-from-home options.
PUBLISHED APR 9, 2024
Cover Image Source: The Amazon logo | Getty Images | Photo by Nathan Stirk
Cover Image Source: The Amazon logo | Getty Images | Photo by Nathan Stirk

In the world of remote work, the allure of becoming an "Amazon Product Tester" has drawn the attention of many. However, beneath the promise of easy money lies a sophisticated scam preying on unsuspecting individuals seeking legitimate work-from-home options. Here's how the scam works:

Cover Image Source: GettyImages | David Ryder  Stringer
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by David Ryder Stringer

At first glance, it appears enticing: Amazon sends you products at no cost, simply for your evaluation and honest feedback. However, many of the advertisements promoting these positions are fraudulent. Watchdogs like Trend Micro have observed a surge in these schemes.

Fake job postings for "product testers" have flooded social media platforms like Facebook and TikTok. One such advertisement reads: "Former Amazon employee here – not widely known, but Amazon offers a program where you can receive $1,500 monthly credited to your Amazon account for testing and reviewing their products."

Scammers create meticulously crafted websites and social media profiles, masquerading as official Amazon platforms. These sites feature enticing job openings, application forms, and fabricated testimonials, meticulously designed to emulate the company's credibility.



Aggressively promoting their fraudulent listings across reputable job search websites, forums, and social media platforms, scammers target a broad audience actively seeking remote work opportunities. By strategically utilizing hashtags and purchasing internet ads, they ensure maximum visibility.

Eager applicants are lured into providing extensive personal information under the guise of a standard application process. However, this data is harvested by scammers for nefarious purposes, including identity theft and fraud.

Applicants are coerced into completing a series of tasks, purportedly to demonstrate their suitability for the role. These tasks range from online surveys and trial offers to purchase specific products at inflated prices, all orchestrated to generate profits for the scammers.

Amazon | Getty Images
ImageSource: Amazon | Getty Images

Through application fees, affiliate commissions, and the sale of stolen personal information, scammers profit immensely from the unsuspecting victims ensnared in their web of deceit. Meanwhile, those who fell victim to the scam are left empty-handed and disillusioned.

Exercise caution when encountering job postings that promise high earnings with minimal effort or require extensive personal information upfront. You must also research the company thoroughly and be wary of vague job descriptions or requests for payment.

Unfortunately, recovering losses from online scams can be challenging. However, reporting the incident to the appropriate authorities increases the chances of apprehending the perpetrators and preventing future victims.

The logo of Amazon at the company logistics center | Getty Images | Photo by Chesnot
Image Source: The logo of Amazon at the company logistics center | Getty Images | Photo by Chesnot

If you suspect you have fallen victim to the Amazon product tester scam, it's important to act immediately. Contact your financial institution to report any unauthorized transactions and monitor your accounts for suspicious activity. Also, file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and consider placing a fraud alert on your credit report.

Remember, if an opportunity sounds too good to be true, it likely is.

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